Continuing Education Trainings on HIV Care for Black MSM

Continuing Education Trainings on HIV Care for Black MSM

November 29, 2017
TARGET Center
Logo His Health

Guest Blog from His Health - Online training for health care professionals on delivery of HIV care for black men who have sex with men (MSM) is available from His Health, a HRSA-funded training initiative. His Health offers a full range of resources to enhance linkage, retention, and engagement strategies targeting Black MSM. (His Health is possible through a HRSA cooperative agreement with NASTAD.)

CME/CNE Trainings

His Health CME CNE Trainings

His Health offers free online CME/CNE trainings in four categories: Linkage and EngagementPrEPWhole-Health Assessment, and Transgender Health. The series provides healthcare providers and stakeholders with proven and effective tools, models of care, and resources and trainings to improve the health and wellness of Black MSM and transgender patients. Medical professionals earn 1.0 continuing education credit for each module completed. In this blog, we highlight the Linkage and Engagement training. 

Linkage and Engagement Training

Young people manage their health in ways that are dramatically different from adults. The Linkage and Engagement training is designed to help health care professionals engage young Black gay men in HIV care. Topics include:

  • Developing or improving cultural competencies for working with young patients.
  • Using relationship-building as a strategy for supporting engagement in care.
  • Creating environments, systems, and services to effectively engage young patients.
  • Developing standard practices for engaging youth in ongoing care.

Facts About HIV and Young People

  • Over 50% of HIV-positive youth don’t know they are infected.
  • Only 21% of HIV-positive youth are engaged in care.
  • At all stages of the HIV Care Continuum, youth are faring poorly, with only 13% achieving viral suppression.
  • Young Black MSM have the highest risk with a 1 in 4 chance of being infected with HIV by age 25.